Tuesday, January 31, 2006

Radical WOC: Last Day to Submit

Just a reminder . Today is the last day to submit to the Radical Women of Color Carnival:

Because Women of Color recognize that real world structural inequalities such as poverty, violence, imprisonment, and community neglect, have restricted our access to the resources the internet has to offer our communities,

Because Women of Color recognize that computer literacy is a right that has long been denied to our communities,

Because the internet has been used as a tool to further racist, sexist, and anti-queer fantasies/representations of Women of Color,

Because Women of Color recognize that these racist, sexist, and anti-queer fantasies/representations have very real world consequences for our communities and us,

Because Women of Color demand that the resources the internet has to offer be available to our communities,

Because Women of Color demand that computer literacy be restructured as to include those of us who must learn the computer in restricted settings (libraries, prisons, institutions, etc)

Because Women of Color demand a powerful, healthy, intelligent and WHOLE representation of themselves on the internet,

the Radical Woman of Color Blog Carnival has been created!!

**Centering the voices, opinions, issues, interests, demands, problems, and solutions of women of color, this blog carnival will be used to connect the real world issues such as poverty, violence, imprisonment, and community neglect to the blogosphere.

**Publication date will be the first (1rst) of every month.

**The first publication will be put out at Jenn’s blog; www.reappropriate.com

**TOPIC ONE:
What does the internet *mean* to a woman of color?

Although often touted as the “last frontier” and positioned as something which is essential to learn in the modern day world, the internet has often been used to further very scary and unrealistic resprentations and fantasies of women of color. Furthering this passive violence, it is often the sweat shop labor of women of color that creates computers to begin with.

At the same time, however, the interent can be and often is used as a tool to connect isolated young mothers to other mothers, survivors of sexual violence to advocacy groups, disabled women to resources and a whole generation of amazing teens to other teens. The blogosphere is also used specifically as a space to cover stories that mainstream press refuse to or is too scared to.

To harnass the good of the internet, it is essential for Women of Color to better define what the interent means to us, (the good and the bad) and then work together to figure out how we can use it for our communities purposes and needs.


As such, we will be accepting submissions which question, challenge, discuss, explore, and name what the internet has meant and what it *could mean* to women of color. Is it a site of sexualized violence? A site of sexualized freedom? An opportunity to make your voice heard where there was none before? A site of further marginilization and disappointment?

Send us your stories!!!


Because this is a Woman of Color Carnival for women of color and put together by women of color, this carnival will prioritize those submissions written by and that centralize women of color issues.

To nominate or submit posts, you may email them to Jenn at jenn@reappropriate.com.

Monday, January 30, 2006

Two Nights

Two nights couldn't be more different even if the circumstances were so similar. Both were former co-workers of a friend. I flirted with both at events celebrating something. With one, however, the intent was clear, direct. We were going to fuck and that was that. There wasn't much get to know you talk. I couldn't delve deeper than his hard on. With the other there was subtlety. In the back of our minds we both knew where we would end up, through the talk of what women and men want, the flirtation of placing his hands on my hips, the long subway ride to his apartment. Maybe that was the difference. One letting me into his space. I could see photographs on his shelves, open his refrigerator to see what he ate, what soap he used, what books he read. He slept for a short while and I learned that he snored. He asked me to stay and wouldn't have minded but I needed to return home. I would leave behind my smell on his sheets even after I had stepped into a taxi to take me back to my world.

One of the two called me. He ran into my friend. Sought out my phone number and called. That implies the possibility of another encounter or maybe working backwards and speaking about things outside the realm of sex. And yet when I saw him in person , he would barely say two words to me. It didn't bother me but it struck me. It would have been better if had just let that night be that night with no follow up phone call. We would have seen each other again, greeted one another with knowing smiles and keep on.

I didn't leave my number this time but he did ask me if I had his as I walked to the taxi. I will admit to being too exhausted at the time to stop and write it down and part of me regrets that ( I also couldn't find my apartment keys) But at least he asked. He said he had my number. I don't know if he will use it or if we will run into each other at an event and smile knowingly at one another before keeping on.

Friday, January 27, 2006

I'm Just A Little More Impulsive Than Most

An article in this week's Village Voice has me reflecting on my own mental health issues. A few years ago I had what most would call a breakdown. In Spanish we like to call it un ataque de nervios. Sometimes I refer to it as my breakthrough. Years of pent up emotions and hiding not to healthy behavior just spilled over and I disappeared. Just walked out of my apartment, leaving my daughter in my mother's care and left. I wandered. I drank. I cried. By myself. I figured out that something wasn't quite right and ended up at Mt. Sinai Hospital where I eventually was diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder. When I told some friends, they weren't surprised. Others didn't buy into the whole psychiatric illness thing. I too was and still remain on the fence.
I have refused to medicate myself. This is mostly because of my own fear of abusing the medication more than anything. Oh yeah and I actually do worry about the meds messing up my "creativity" . I haven't been in therapy recently and am wondering if I should be or if it's bs. I've gotten better controlling my impulses ,not so much my moods. So I guess I still remain borderline something or other. On the borderline of what is what I'm still figuring out.

Wednesday, January 25, 2006

I need a webcam!!!

Anyone local have one I can borrow?

Tuesday, January 24, 2006

The End of an Era

Maybe I'm feeling all nostalgic because I've been hanging out a lot recently with my first real boyfriend and the boy I lost my virginity to (I took his too). I even performed a poem about him and how I broke his heart twice ( I did bad mala that I am). In the 12 years that we have known each other he had never seen me recite my poetry. He said he enjoyed it but it made him feel self-aware even though no one knew it was about him. Not like the time I wrote the poem for a lover I call "la lengua" and well everyone pretty much knew what was up. I like making people uncomfortable in their own skin. Sick sick mala.

I'm under no illusions that anything will happen between the marine (as he was in the marines) and me. I broke his heart twice and we are friendly yet flirtatious with each other. So while I'm not fantasizing about us being a couple again, I am wondering what the hell is going on in that EcuaRican head of his everytime he chooses to kiss me goodbye on the mouth instead of on the cheek. I mean could we really just be friends???

Earlier this week I learned that the movie theatre where we had our first date is going to become a chain store. We were 16 and bought tickets to see the horribly horrible Demolition Man with Sly Stallone. I don't remember much about the movie because well we didn't watch much of the movie. It's much more romantic and sweet to have a movie theatre to point out than a chain store. Fucking chain stores.

Monday, January 23, 2006

You Surf Like a Girl

Do I though? There's been a lot of discussion about the role of women on the net and in the blogosphere. It's something that Fabulosa, Nubian, and Brownfemipower have been talkin' bout the role women of color specifically . So much so there is a radical women of color carnival comin' up and a growing radical women of color blogring.

So this article I stumbled upon on AlterNet and recent posts by some mujer bloggers I love has me thinking about the why I blog and why I use the internet the way I do. I went online originally not to nurture social networks but to indulge my exhibitionist sensibilities. It unfolded into a means of expression, an arena for self-promotion, and yes a place to build relationships , community with mamis, mujeres, writers (and the occasional lover). And yet despite the fact that much of my life is tethered to the computer and the worlds it represents/mirrors my knowledge of the technology is limited.

I guess if I spent less time pouring my heart out and telling stories and sharing opinions I'd have time to teach myself how to build my own webpage. Mamihood, writing, and working take up time too. I have a techy to-do list that is very long and some of it remains out of my reach for financial reasons. Could that be another reason why there is such a tech knowledge gap and why women and men and people of color use the net in such different ways?

Saturday, January 21, 2006

Technology is a Beautiful Thing

I waver between hating my caller id and loving it. Lost is the element of surprise when you pick up the phone but gained is the ability to ignore phone calls. I admit that I appreciate the extra few seconds my mind has to prepare itself when a name flashes on that little screen. A client hears my most professional hello. A current lover (well actually there is no current anything but that is beside the point) can get a witty/sexy/charming greeting. My best friend will get pure silliness. But how to prepare yourself for a phone call you never expected. I never gave this person my number.

Yes one night I picked him out and shamelessly flirted with him, made eyes at him in the hipster bar/restaurant and made suggestive um suggestions between karaoke sets. Part of the thing is not making it seem calculated. Making him think he is in the lead because you see gentleman...you are not the only ones who can have desire for just one night, for just one thing, with just one person. He was a little rough around the edges, the type I generally like to think I've outgrown. In the words of my best friend there was something so "high school" about him. Was it the eagerness? The way he worried and overthought the logistics, the where and the when and the how instead of just enjoying the flirtation, anticipation, and expectation.
"Excuse me so I can get a prophylactic" He told me as he pulled his hand back from inside my pants.
Seriously he said prophylactic. If I had been truly into technology I would have called my best friend to tell her:
Oh my god I am about to fuck this guy who just used the word prophylactic
Who says that?
The same type of men who call it a preservative in Spanish

Then we would break out in raucous laughter. But I had no cell phone so I laughed to myself as I lit a cigarette and awaited his return.

We didn't exchange numbers that night. I hopped in a cab home. He walked across the street to his mother's house. And yet about a month later here was his name and his number flashing on my caller id. I played it cool. Answering the phone normally.
Hi, how are you?

Hi. Um Who is this?

Don't you remember you gave me your number yesterday?

Oh yeah where because I don't remember giving anyone my number yesterday?

Hi it's me South Side Boy (of course that is not his real name. You didn't really think I would name him did you?)

Oh, Hi!! What a surprise. Happy New Year. Everything just happened so fast last I saw you.

He told me he had gotten my number from my friend at church. We chit-chatted and flirted and teased. He still sounded like the type of person I thought I had outgrown but then again I am known for revisiting the past over and over and over. I told him to call me and maybe we could hang out and I left it at that.

Yeah I love technology because thanks to it I can tell this story here on this blog.

Thursday, January 19, 2006

Forks and Awards : MapucheRican Milestones


Consider this, to use the words of one of readers, an annoying distraction from sex stories (I don't have any to share at the moment- please leave your applications). My sporadic blogging has been due more to mamihood obligations than South Side boys fucking me across the street from where they live with their mothers.

On Three King's Day, los tres reyes brought us our first visit to the emergency Room. I was sitting at the kitchen table tutoring a schoolmate of la Mapu on the importance of the period when I hear a scream coming from my daughter who was on "Enu" (an Ernie step thing that she has called Enu since forever) getting a cup from a cabinet.
"Call 911! Call 911" She's yelling. I run over to find that the tine of a serving fork had gone through her left ring finger. My student was picked up almost immediately and I threw a shawl over la Mapu so we could run over to the nearest hospital (about 5 blocks away). I couldn't put a coat on her well because she had a fork stuck in her left hand and was holding it up with her right. One lady on the street asked me accusingly, "Don't you have a coat for that child?"
I responded, "yes lady I do but in case you haven't noticed my kid has a fork stuck in her finger, the fucking coat is the least of my problems."
La pobre MapucheRican was crying and asking why this happened to her and if it happened because she did something bad.

Once in the ER I grabbed the nurse and told her my daughter had a fork through her finger that needed to be taken out stat. The nurse looked at me and asked, "Are you kidding me?" I told her that damnit I wasn't and to please tend to my child. She was given 5 shots of a local anesthetic, after which she was still screaming.
"It can't possibly still hurt?" the doctor asked her.
"No! But I'm scared!" My daughter yelled. I wanted to cry. Pobrecita. 1...2....3... and the fork was removed. After determining she needed no stitches , we were on our way home about two hours after we came in. Not bad for a NYC ER.

On a happier note, la Mapu was deemed student of the month at her public school. The Principal gave her an award certificate and a medal which apparently between last night and this morning disappeared.

::sigh::

Wednesday, January 18, 2006

Reflections on the Death of a 7 year old

She's blurring kindergarten class picture, the kind I have of my own public school educated daughter. She's a red power ranger staring off. She is dressed in white today, all made up and pretty for her burial. Nixzmary Brown was just another little girl of color in Brownsville. Just another brown baby being beat, denied food, and sexually abused and no one gave enough of a shit until it was too late. No one lined up to knock on the door of the apartment where she lived and died. Now they line up outside the Ortiz Funeral Home to say goodbye.

Were there guidance counselors , social workers in her school? Most public schools don't have that support. My daughter's school doesn't. Yeah now the DA will scramble and the Mayor will say he'll reform ACS and people will curse Nixzmary's parents and then everyone will forget just like they forget after Eliza Izquierdo.

Saturday, January 14, 2006

The U.S. Military Using Bloggers to Promote Themselves?

Friday, January 13, 2006

Placing the Murder of Filiberto Ojeda Rios in a Historical Context

Thursday, January 12, 2006

Cum and Find Me

Ms. Nubian of Blac(k)ademic wrote about this issue at length but I thought I'd weigh in with my own experience of how people have "found" this blog. Just looking today at my visitors, people have come here looking for "SEX CHICA BLACK" , "latin mami trailers", "PIERNOTAS", "boricua mamis", "latinas big ass booty photos", "mala sex" oh and this picture, that yes is my own piernota. Then there is the fact that a site that I find extremely offensive because of the way it objectifies women of color and seems to have no problem with the sexploitation of women in the third world sex industry (to the point of promoting it) links here.

Do I blame myself? After all I am the one who in her own poetry and writing uses words like "fuck", "chocha" "puta" ( I can only imagine how this post will generate hits from people looking for something to jerk off to). I am the one who is a self-proclaimed exhibitionist and yes posts pictures of my stocking clad leg. Is it the fault of search engines like Google and their programmers who link my use of words to porn sites without filters for context? Are there even filters for context (come on web programmers...tell me!!)? Or is it the fault of a culture that has transformed Latina bodies into detachable mastabatory fodder. Big Asses. Brown, Black Asses. Breasts. Legs. We have become mutilated. Pieces instead of wholes. And am I because of this to be silenced about my sexuality? Can I not write about sex , good and bad and my experiences with it , and how it is a part of my identity as much as my being Puerto Rican, Nuyorican, a mami, a writer etc etc etc without it being stolen and placed into some exotic fantasy?

Yesterday I received an email from someone who came here, lured by my thigh highs. He did read my writing and came to the correct conclusion that I am more than a leg to be ordered from the internet version of KFC's value menu. But what was he expecting when he came here? Before the new year another male emailed me and basically began kicking it to me via email and it became obvious that he didn't bother to read anything about where I come from, what I think or to steal a line from one of my own poems, " the history my lips , hips, and tits carry".

This is not your porn site. I am not your exxxotic girl. I am not your throw away stereotype.

This is my fantasy and reality.

Wednesday, January 11, 2006

It's a Radical Women of Color Carnival!!

ANNOUNCING: WOMEN OF COLOR BLOG CARNIVAL
~~~a call out for submissions~~~

Because Women of Color recognize that real world structural inequalities such as poverty, violence, imprisonment, and community neglect, have restricted our access to the resources the internet has to offer our communities,

Because Women of Color recognize that computer literacy is a right that has long been denied to our communities,

Because the internet has been used as a tool to further racist, sexist, and anti-queer fantasies/representations of Women of Color,

Because Women of Color recognize that these racist, sexist, and anti-queer fantasies/representations have very real world consequences for our communities and us,

Because Women of Color demand that the resources the internet has to offer be available to our communities,

Because Women of Color demand that computer literacy be restructured as to include those of us who must learn the computer in restricted settings (libraries, prisons, institutions, etc)

Because Women of Color demand a powerful, healthy, intelligent and WHOLE representation of themselves on the internet,

the Radical Woman of Color Blog Carnival has been created!!

**Centering the voices, opinions, issues, interests, demands, problems, and solutions of women of color, this blog carnival will be used to connect the real world issues such as poverty, violence, imprisonment, and community neglect to the blogosphere.

**Publication date will be the first (1rst) of every month.

**The first publication will be put out at Jenn’s blog; www.reappropriate.com

**TOPIC ONE:
What does the internet *mean* to a woman of color?

Although often touted as the “last frontier” and positioned as something which is essential to learn in the modern day world, the internet has often been used to further very scary and unrealistic resprentations and fantasies of women of color. Furthering this passive violence, it is often the sweat shop labor of women of color that creates computers to begin with.

At the same time, however, the interent can be and often is used as a tool to connect isolated young mothers to other mothers, survivors of sexual violence to advocacy groups, disabled women to resources and a whole generation of amazing teens to other teens. The blogosphere is also used specifically as a space to cover stories that mainstream press refuse to or is too scared to.

To harnass the good of the internet, it is essential for Women of Color to better define what the interent means to us, (the good and the bad) and then work together to figure out how we can use it for our communities purposes and needs.


As such, we will be accepting submissions which question, challenge, discuss, explore, and name what the internet has meant and what it *could mean* to women of color. Is it a site of sexualized violence? A site of sexualized freedom? An opportunity to make your voice heard where there was none before? A site of further marginilization and disappointment? Some examples of excellent critiques of the internet that might get your creative juices flowing:
Where Are My Asian Sisters? by Jenn

Why the Internet Hurts Women of Color by Nubian

But of course, these are just examples--creative writing, art, journal type entries, etc will all be accepted!

Send us your stories!!!


Because this is a Woman of Color Carnival for women of color and put together by women of color, this carnival will prioritize those submissions written by and that centralize women of color issues.

To nominate or submit posts, you may email them to Jenn at jenn@reappropriate.com.

Thursday, January 05, 2006

Oh what a surprise: Police Are Brutal in NYC

The even bigger surprise is that the report came from the NY Post: --
There were over 1,000 more allegations of misconduct against the NYPD in 2005 than the year before — and over 100 more complaints that were "substantiated," Civilian Complaint Review Board statistics show.

Wednesday, January 04, 2006

Hey Look a Good Restaurant in My Hood

Don't take my word for it, read what the Village Voice said about Istanbul

Tuesday, January 03, 2006

It May be a new year but it's the same ole same ole for Puerto Rico

Angry Brown Butch beat me to it yesterday by posting about the Interagency Report by the President'’s Task Force on Puerto Rico'’s Status, an effort initiated by President Clinton in 2000 and renewed by Bush in 2003.

I first read about the report on NYC Indymedia and when I read the article's spin on the report I just shook my head and said, "same game, different name".

The United State's government can window dress Puerto Rico's status until the proverbial cows come home. What doesn't change is the fact that Puerto Ricans have no say as to their own future. And if you ask for some say too loudly well just look at what happened to Don Filiberto or what continues to happen to the Puerto Rican political prisoners.

So the choice, in my opinion, lays not iplebisciteses sponsored by the United Stategovernmentnt, which in my opinion are nothing more than glorified opinion polls, but rather in the hands of yes the Puerto Rican and the international community. A Colony by any other name is still a colony.

Monday, January 02, 2006

IT’S TIME TO GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY THAT HOSTED THE COLOR OF VIOLENCE III.

In March 2005, the City of New Orleans, and specifically the Treme Community, one of the oldest communities of free Africans in America, generously hosted INCITE! for the Color of Violence III. Local residents, activists and organizers opened their homes, school, churches, community center, auditorium, and hearts to us, sharing their struggles while helping us create a unique space for organizing against all forms of violence against women of color in the U.S. and around the world.

Just six months later, New Orleans was devastated by Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath, in which the many intersecting systems of oppression we theorized and organized around at COV III converged in the lives of survivors. The Treme Community, which for many of us was a temporary home for three beautiful days in March, was particularly hard hit by waves of water, racism, classism, and the impacts of U.S. imperialism abroad. Women of color, because of their location at the intersection of these forces, as well as their roles as caregivers to young, elderly, and disabled people, have been on the front lines of struggles for survival in the days and months following Katrina. However, the needs of low-income women of color struggling against poverty and powerlessness resulting from systemic racism and sexism have not been central to government or non-profit responses.

INCITE! is now calling on women of color who participated in the Color of Violence, members of INCITE! chapters & affiliates, and women of color allies, to support the women of New Orleans through the work of the INCITE! New Orleans chapter.

What can I do?

• Join or support an INCITE! delegation to New Orleans. The women of INCITE! New Orleans have been centrally involved in establishing and supporting the Women’s Health Center project of the People’s Hurricane Relief Fund (http://www.communitylaborunited.net). They are also building toward the creation of a Women of Color Organizing and Resource Center, which will serve as a hub for organizing among low-income women of color for meaningful participation in the reconstruction of New Orleans, the rights of workers – both immigrant and non-immigrant – who are the backbone of reconstruction efforts, health, safety & housing rights for women of color returning to New Orleans, and community-based responses to violence and approaches to safety.
Volunteers with health care, education, community health promotion and stress, grief, domestic violence, and sexual assault counseling are urgently needed to support the work of the Women’s Health Center.

Drivers and individuals willing and able to conduct intake, outreach, and provide childcare are also needed.

Individuals with fundraising & organizing experience with respect to housing, environmental justice, health and safety, immigrant and workers’ rights, and violence against women are needed to assist in the development, resourcing, and establishment of the Women of Color Organizing and Resource Center.
INCITE! will be coordinating rotating delegations of 3-10 individuals for stays of a week or more throughout the early part of 2006 to support these INCITE! New Orleans initiatives. PLEASE NOTE THAT WE ARE PRIORITIZING THE PARTICIPATION OF WOMEN OF COLOR IN THESE DELEGATIONS.

For more information, please contact incite_national@yahoo.com or call and leave a message at (484) 932-3166.

IMPORTANT! INCITE! NEW ORLEANS ASKS THAT YOU NOT TRAVEL TO NEW ORLEANS WITHOUT PARTICIPATING IN A COORDINATED DELEGATION. Resources, including housing, transportation, and food continue to be scarce in New Orleans, and many are being taken up by “relief” workers and contractors, to the detriment of New Orleans residents seeking to return to their homes.

Be aware that delegation participants will be housed under “rough” conditions (on the floor, no hot water, etc.) and will be asked to bring basic supplies for themselves and to meet local needs. We will be working long hours, and will likely participate in physical work needed to assist in rebuilding basic infrastructure.

• If you cannot travel to New Orleans, we still need your help! The Women’s Health Center needs supplies and material support. Organize a fundraiser or supply drive in your community to help meet women’s basic health needs in New Orleans in the face of collapsed infrastructure, widespread presence of environmental contaminants, mold, and refuse, and failure of supplies collected by the Red Cross and FEMA to reach women most in need. For a list of supplies needed, please contact us at incite_national@yahoo.com or call and leave a message at (484) 932-3166. Send your financial contributions to INCITE!, P.O. Box 226, Redmond WA 98073 and put INCITE! New Orleans in the memo line.

• Organize to support folks in your area! New Orleans residents have been scattered throughout the country, and many are still housed in government facilities (i.e. army bases), shelters, churches, and hotels. Support New Orleans residents in your area by:

• Identifying where survivors are living and organizing in your area;

• Facilitating forums for New Orleans survivors to come together, share their experiences, and organize around the right of return and New Orleans reconstruction;

• Distributing information about resources available in your local area to survivors. Government agencies have made little or no effort to help survivors access local housing, income support, education, child care, medical, transportation and anti-violence resources.

• Support local survivors’ councils in their advocacy efforts around relief, return, and rebuilding. Offer office space, fax, copying and telephone facilities and woman power to their organizing efforts.

• Facilitate legal clinics to assist survivors in accessing information and benefits from FEMA and the Red Cross, and in fighting eviction and foreclosure proceedings with respect to their homes in New Orleans.

• Advocate for a full accounting of the current location of all New Orleans residents and publication of FEMA and Red Cross databases. Demand an extension of hurricane-related housing and income support. Visit http://www.katrinaaction.org. Support the following survivors demands:

The People’s Declaration: Survivors Assembly Demands
Identified by survivors on December 9, 2005

We demand that the local, state and federal government make conditions possible for our immediate return. This includes the following:

The Nagin Administration must make temporary housing such as apartments, hotel rooms, trailers and public housing developments available for us while we rebuild our homes.

The government must put an end to price gouging, stop all evictions and make rents affordable.

Local residents must take the lead in rebuilding our communities and must be hired to do the rebuilding work.

There must be immediate debt relief for debt associated with this disaster.

Quality public education and childcare must be provided for our children.

Quality affordable health care and access to free prescriptions must be provided.

The government must immediately clean up air, water and soil to make it safe and healthy for people to return home.

We demand that the government provide funds for all families to be reunited and that the databases of FEMA, Red Cross and any organizations tracking our people be made public.

We demand accountability for and oversight of the over $50 billion of FEMA funds and the money raised by other organizations, foundations and funds in our name.

We demand representation on all boards that are making decisions about relief and reconstruction. We also demand that those most affected by Hurricane Katrina be part of every stage of the planning process.

We demand that no commercial Mardi Gras takes place until the suffering of the people is lifted.

We are calling for survivors and supporters to participate in a Martin Luther King Jr. Weekend 2006 conference and demonstration to make these demands heard!

How do I get involved?
CONTACT US at:
incite_national@yahoo.com or
call and leave a message at (484) 932-3166

Send your financial contributions to INCITE!, P.O. Box 226, Redmond WA 98073 and put INCITE! New Orleans in the memo line.

Be sure to let us know about the organizing you are doing in your local area so that we can share that information with the women of INCITE! New Orleans!

****
INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence is a national activist organization of radical feminists of color advancing a movement to end violence against women of color and their communities through direct action, critical dialogue and grassroots organizing. For more information, see our website at:
www.incite-national.org

Sunday, January 01, 2006

Feliz 2006

Happy New Year to all regular readers, friends, ex-lovers, current lovers, lovers to be lover wannabes, and those who have just stumbled upon this blog.

Look for design changes, an attempt at more regular updates and despite my best efforts, much drama and excitement.

New Years with la Mala was fairly uneventful. I cooked shrimp, there was dancing, wine and champagne. We celebrated the new year twice, once for Puerto Rico and once for NYC. I fought with la Mapu who wanted to watch the Twilight Zone marathon instead of dancing with me. I didn't have any lover to kiss but I had the love of my life mi hija, so that was fine with me.

Lest you think I have become completely normal, I did call el Cubano . I left good wishes on his answering machine (with la Mapu in the background, saying I should call him a jerk) then I erased his number from my phone book and my phone. So ya. Chapter closed.

Today I am certain that I actually have students. I will post my resolutions later and I will tell you about how singing "I touch myself" in a karaoke bar in the heart of hipster Williamsburg leads to nothing but sin.